Kranji Countryside Farmers’ Market 12th Edition

KCFM 12 PROMO 2018 EDM

Treat your taste buds to our hot sellers at the upcoming Kranji Countryside Farmers’ Market! While stock lasts!

KCFM 12th Edition Promo
31st March
, 12-6pm & 1st April 10am-4pm

1. Spend $20 on any items at JFF booth at KCFM 12th
2. ‘Like’ and ‘Share’ our Facebook post
3. Receive a free skewer of frog meat or crocodile nuggets worth $5! T&Cs Apply*

*Limited to one free skewer per purchase and ‘like & share’ of FB post.
*Redemption must be done at the time of purchase

For more information on other activities/happenings in the Kranji Countryside Farmers’ Market,please refer to https://www.facebook.com/farmersmarketsg

12th Farmers' Market-Poster-Web

Pioneer, Founder, Father – Mr Wan Bock Thiaw, the JFF Story

“When Mr Wan Bock Thiaw goes to sleep each night, he usually hears a cacophony of croaking.

It is the mating call of thousands of bullfrogs in the backyard of his single-storey house in Lim Chu Kang.

To him, it is a lullaby which sends him deeper into dreamland. The croaking means more baby frogs will be produced for his family-run frog breeding business.”

This was an excerpt taken in 21 July 1997 from The Straits Times, entitled ‘Frog porridge anyone? – Jumping frog legs, aren’t they popular?’  

mr-wan-younger-days-1
Mr Wan during his younger days!

1997 was almost 10 years ago and now that his children are all grown up, he could finally take a well-deserved break. But does he? Farmers never rest and rest is for the wicked, words from Jackson and Chelsea respectively. Mr Wan certainly understands and embodies the value of hard work which he clearly imparts to his children.

His daughter Chelsea joined the business 10 years ago in 2006 after graduating from NUS with a Sociology degree. When asked if she feels that her daughter has “wasted” her degree, Mr Wan earnestly replied, “行行出状元”. Anybody can excel in any line of work and industry as long as they devote their heart into it. Now that his son Jackson has joined the business, the Wan frog family is stronger and more united than ever.

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Mr Wan conducting a tour in his younger days!

Now as JFF celebrates its 35th Anniversary, Mr Wan still remains very active in the farm. He still wakes up as early as 6am in the morning to check on the husbandry on the farm. Occasionally, he still delivers the orders himself to old and loyal customers in the wee hours, many of whom have become friends with him by now.

With his daughter and son working side by side with him now, Mr Wan understands and appreciates that everybody is an important asset to the company. Each individual’s actions are the building blocks to JFF’s vision for high quality frog products and the persistence for this vision need to be translated to the customers through these individuals.

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The JFF Family!

– Zheng Xun

Green Living Eco Lifestyle Event 2016

Green Living Eco Lifestyle Event

Jurong Frog Farm is participating in the Green Living Eco Lifestyle Event http://www.green-living.com.sg/ under their Sustainability partner, Gardenasia’s incubation platform, tomorrow till Sunday (9 – 11 Sep), 10am to 7pm at Marina Bay Sands Convention Centre.

This year’s Green Living Eco Lifestyle Event is inspired by the central theme “Cities of Love”. It advocates the love for our home & country by learning, experiencing and adopting green products to lead a modern and convenient lifestyle, while minimizing the negative impact of our consumption to the environment and society.

Going “Green” (just like our frogs), recycling and minimizing consumption has always been a key social responsibility of JFF. While we strive for a modern and convenient lifestyle, we cannot forget that there is nothing convenient about raising crops and breeding frogs. It takes a lot of time, patience and tender loving care by our farmers.

JFF is also pretty serious about bio recycling on their farm! We will be bringing out a 100% locally sourced and manufactured product, our bottled Premium Hashima with American ginseng and also Specially Selected Dried Hashima to this fair. Sampling will also be available on request!

So next time when you are busy gobbling down the Frog Porridge in Geylang or gobbling down our Buttermilk Cajun Frog Meat or Royal Hashima Dessert at our Farm. Please take a breather to remember the farmers’ effort that goes into that cultivation of all those frogs.

Adopt a green living lifestyle today and you can certainly start by finishing all your food at mealtimes today!

(Source: http://www.green-living.com.sg/our-story/)

A note to all my visitors as JFF approaches her 31st Anniversary

It’s interesting to note the reactions of people who visit the farm. While some may be appalled with the current state of this 18 years old facility, others may applaud that this farm has retained its rustic charm, unperturbed by this nation’s belief built on Plastic, Progress and Prosperity.

Have to salute my 60 year old father’s effort since late 1970s on building this farm with his bare hands and with very limited resources. He had the help and support of his wife who helped with book keeping and also chaperoning their 3 young children in and out of the remote Old Jurong Road. This farm which initially started out as a self sustainable breeding model is one now that is a commercialized million dollar turn over business. He has well compensated his lack of education with his sharp business acumen and his diligence and technical knowhow when he was working in the oil and gas industry.

For the last 15 years since I was able to understand his lack of presence at home, as an adolescent, I have witnessed my father worked incessantly on the farm which he is still doing currently. It was a bold move in the 1990s when he decided to keep up with the times and opened the farm to the public. Throngs of people from the RCs, CCs, and schools mill into the farm every weekend to pick up freshly slaughtered fresh frog meat and other livestock like catfish and snakeheads.

Opening this privately owned production farm to the public provided an opportunity for me as a Singaporean graduate to become a 2nd generation business owner. I grabbed this great opportunity as a young adult in my early 20s. My relationship with the visitors has never been simple. Back when I was a child residing in the farm, I used to see people walking into our house, taking off their shoes and walking into my home to use my toilets as if it is an entitlement. We encountered and still are seeing the same problems with the only surviving Kampong in Singapore, people littering, abusing the facilities, and sometimes, they walk into our facilities only to abuse the people working in it.

Seldom, you get credits for what you are doing right. More than often you get penalized for the lapses due to what you did not do.

Isn’t it important for our younger generation to know that farms (whether it is a production or a show farm) exist and are important features of our country? Aren’t we also a part of national education in the history of Singapore which saw the farms having to transcend to remain relevant in this time and age?

Malaysians will tell you that this place feels comfortable like home not only because of the proximity we are from JB, but simply JFF is a reflection of the frog farming industry in Singapore 20 years back. Operations have certainly changed, business has become diversified but the place remains the same. The faster this country moves, the harder the people are whipped to keep pace with progress.

Nostalgia – This must be what many generations of Singaporeans, from the baby boomers to the Gen Y, can identify with.

Australians will tell you that this is an interesting place because they embrace and accept the diversity of what Singapore offers. We will have a high and mighty, snooty side like MBS, but we also offer a humble, down to earth rustic charm in the Kranji Countryside.

Others from certain parts of the world might come in baffled by this existence of a rural, backward, frogs not in lily padded ponds but in pens and questioned why did our government, one that is “prim and proper” allow this existence? Spot on. The farm’s lifespan on this plot of land in Lim Chu Kang is timed. Nothing really lasts forever in Singapore anyway. I implore you to come and appreciate what you see here because we may not be here much longer.

To some of our dear foreign visitors, if you are expecting a 5 star toilet experience or maybe l’occitane fragrance in farms, simply because this is the first world Singapore, please do not have your hopes up too high. We are only a family of 5 who have lived on, were fed and educated by this trade which my father started. What works in your country may not work in mine. Diversity is the only normal these days so if I do not tell you how to live please do not come and tell me how my frogs and I should live.

 Without you, my dear visitors, who have given me so much support and advice, I would truly be “that frog in the well”. However, I hope that you would adopt “live and let live” as your motto too. Please accept and be nice to the people living in this host country you are visiting.

 As JFF approaches her 31st anniversary in October, and I am into my 7th year of employment here, I would like to thank all of my staff, my customers, my friends and my family for all the support throughout my stint. I will strive to reach the bar set by society’s standards during the remaining time we have on this premises.

 Written by: Chelsea Wan

Any comments, please contact me at chelseawan@jurongfrogfarm.com.sg.

DAY 5: Vijayawada to Warangal

We started the day with a 1.5 hrs ride to Jagayyapet where many of us attended our first church service.  It was indeed one of the most enthralling experience as the music was blasted, emotions were heightened. Some of the girls witnessed what I would call a cathartic release. A member of the church started jumping up and down, and eventually collapsed on the floor with her face buried in her hands n sari. I am presuming that the weekly church service must be a place to let steam as they gathered to praise their maker.

We were also extremely privileged to have our fellow friends, issac, cas ANd Mcloud to contribute to their service with a message, a song and cas playing the drums! Is sac’s message was extremely heartening as he reminded us of our trials and tribulations being part of the  test by God.

We were then led by the vice president of the factory to visit the cotton mill. Seeing the scale of the manufacturing, It was very much an eye opener for many of us.while I marveled at this extensive mechanization, I couldn’t help but also observed the solemn faces of the workers. Though it was a short 15 minutes walk in the factory, many of us came out with irritated throats and eyes. How happy could one be, working in this chain production? Clearly, welfare is far from the concern of the owners, which comes to my next question, if  this factory is entirely indian owned. The massive production chain was sophisticated and certainly in every sense ‘art of the state’ technology. Given the enormous income disparity in this country, I am pretty sure one of the wealthy Indian would be able to throw in that amount of capital.

After which we were brought to Pastor Kumar’s home for lunch. By now, on this 8th day it is needless for me to explain what was served for lunch! Most of us are accustomed to the voluminous amount of rice/ briyani served and the Indian spices used in the curry, vegetables, potatoes, sauces;not forgetting  the warm hospitality we have very fortunately received everywhere we had gone.

We then took a 4 hours coach ride to Warangal where we met the member of paliarment for Warangal, Rajalah Siricilla,  Mayor of Warangal and David. After the official reception, a very elaborated procession awaited us. The Indian boys strutted their stuff as they danced to the Drums and whistles, the procession was also interluded with fire crackers  very seemingly to make the most amount of noise as possible to let our presence be known and felt in this historical town! Most of us felt very honored and grateful to have this procession planned for us as we  joined in the dance, throwing punches in the air. And cas who couldn’t get over the inhibited session at the church, took over the drumming in closing.

After a short 30 mins freshening in the hotel, we were then whisked to Scarvodaya Youth Organisation office. It is saddening to hear from Hepsibah all the countless issues their country are facing. Some of which are pervasive due to the strong culture, i wondered if these old beliefs and  traditions are primarily the reason why poverty remains largely a problem Here. Girl illiteracy, caste system, violence against women, HIV/AIDs. In this county where there is approximately 250 people every Km square, SYO’s job is enormous!

While I tried to look at the issues India is facing in macroscopic ways, I also realized how massive and heavily populated this country is. Due to the severe lack of basic infrastructure (as we may call it), transportation, sewage system, access to health care,  it is extremely difficult to disseminate information of food safety, basic hygiene, other form of campaigns from the government!

At the end of the day, to loosen this heavy heart,  I  rather embrace this diversity of the human race. and To my fellow friends from 11 countries ( including wales as an independent country not part of UK ) please choose to be on one end of the axis which is to appreciate what we have,  and to make use of what we have got – a brain and a heart, to all the people you will meet, 3 rd world or not.

DAY 1: HYDERABAD

Day 1 –  hyderabad. 

The weather  was good at 21 degrees when we arrived here. This place has a system of very stringent security checks and everyone was puzzled how their bags were going through the layers of security right from arrival at the airport to the hotel! We stayed in novotel airport hotel. This place is massive n modernly constructed. Even the free Internet kiosk were powered by MacBooks!I only found out last night upon arrival that t shirts ( those cap sleeves) n the berms I brought were not adequate at the places which I’ll be visiting. Luckily we have native guides who will take us to the local market to stock up some of these clothing.

I’m v curious on the types of social/agriculture issues pressing ones or not which will unfold themselves as we travel from place to place. Already we hv been intro to problems like domestic violence, child slavery, sanitation, agriculture habits  through the sharing with some of the natives from Hyderabad.In Singapore, our problem is serious as well except that it is Not starkly in your face. Given a small land area with conflicting land use, our government sees defense/economic development being more important than security of supply of food! What fight would it be if our army do not know how to grow their own food. Even food could be used as a warfare, just like water isn’t it? We are facing a war now against these issues much higher on national agenda ( an so we think) but with most of our fellow countrymen living in abundance and comfort, It’s somehow, ironically hard, to instill the thought that food security has to be prioritized! People need to be taught n trained and seeds take time to grow!  In the light of the natural disasters in our neighboring food exporting countries, i’m praying that this will inadvertently start to awaken Singaporean’s sleeping minds.