JFF’s 33rd anniversary celebration!!!

JFF has turned 33 years old yesterday, on 29th October!! It’s incredible to see the growth of this farm in the last decade, attracting countless Singaporeans and also overseas visitors! JFF has come a very long way, having shifted from Old Jurong Road to Lim Chu Kang  in 1994, and also opening up to the public from being a private farm since the early 1990s! That’s amazing! To be honest, I didn’t know about JFF until I was assigned to come here for my internship. When I was first brought here by my facilitator, I didn’t expect it to be such a quaint and tranquil place. I was expected it to be quite noisy with frogs croaking every where!

To celebrate our 33rd birthday, we’re going to have a few activities and bundle deals at our farm on the weekend of our anniversary week, on the 1st & 2nd November.
1. With every entry into the tadpoles’ pen (30 mins/ $6), you may choose from our beautiful royal headband to take home as a keepsake!
2. Next, Frogician and I will do face painting for both children and adults. You get to choose from the many designs you will like on your face!
3. Only for this Sunday, we will have our barbecued exotic range of meat for sale too. Our BBQ skewers have proven to be very popular during the Farmers’ Market, so we’re bringing it back again on this very special occasion. Be sure not to miss it this time if you didn’t manage to catch us during Farmers’ Market!

Note that JFF opens from 9am – 5.30pm, to the general public only on weekends and public holidays and from Tuesday – Friday to appointment bookings and tour reservations only. Come down to the farm this weekend to celebrate JFF’s 33rd birthday with us!! Hope to see all of you!! 🙂

Signing off,
Froglette

JFF celebrates 32nd birthday with special-needs kids from Lighthouse School

JFF celebrates 32nd birthday with special-needs kids from Lighthouse School

JFF turned 32-years old yesterday and celebrated its birthday together with about 30 special-needs children on a sponsored tour. These first-time visitors are from Lighthouse School – a school providing special education to children with visual impairment, hearing impairment or autism.

These children, aged between 7 to 17 years old, were accompanied by their teachers on their learning journey to JFF. Teachers used various means, such as sign language for the hearing-impaired children, and guiding the visually-impaired children by hand to touch the frogs at the farm.

The children were given a short introduction to the life-cycle of frogs, and told about physical differences between male and female frogs. Some courageous children even held the American bull-frogs in their hands, while some shied away. They then got to feed the frogs in the pens, and toured the farm together with their teachers.

JFF sponsored a two-way transport and guided tour for these special kids to mark their anniversary, as part of our ongoing efforts towards building an inclusive society.

Conducting a tour for children with mixed abilities is not without challenges, but the farm guides learnt more about accommodating differences.

Having seen how excited the children were and having received the positive feedback on the experience from the teachers, JFF aims to repeat a sponsorship like this next year. In general, it is important to give more opportunities to people with special needs to integrate into the working world and community at large. With that purpose in mind, JFF has hired a staff who is visually-impaired to work at their farm, and he will be starting work next week.

“This is a refreshing break away from the routines at our school. The children need more outdoors hands-on experiences like this to bring to life what they’ve studied in books. Going out to public places also gives them opportunities to practice social skills such as exhibiting appropriate behaviour, being thankful to hosts, sharing food among friends, etc. We hope to make more tours like this possible with the support of our corporate partners like JFF.,” commented Mr Danesh Kandasamy, teacher for ICT (Info-Comms Technology) at Lighthouse School.

JFF 31ST BIRTHDAY

Hop by in October as we celebrate JFF’S 31st Birthday! We will be conducting a free tour every weekend in October from 10am to 11am & do look out for awesome deals on the month of October!

A note to all my visitors as JFF approaches her 31st Anniversary

It’s interesting to note the reactions of people who visit the farm. While some may be appalled with the current state of this 18 years old facility, others may applaud that this farm has retained its rustic charm, unperturbed by this nation’s belief built on Plastic, Progress and Prosperity.

Have to salute my 60 year old father’s effort since late 1970s on building this farm with his bare hands and with very limited resources. He had the help and support of his wife who helped with book keeping and also chaperoning their 3 young children in and out of the remote Old Jurong Road. This farm which initially started out as a self sustainable breeding model is one now that is a commercialized million dollar turn over business. He has well compensated his lack of education with his sharp business acumen and his diligence and technical knowhow when he was working in the oil and gas industry.

For the last 15 years since I was able to understand his lack of presence at home, as an adolescent, I have witnessed my father worked incessantly on the farm which he is still doing currently. It was a bold move in the 1990s when he decided to keep up with the times and opened the farm to the public. Throngs of people from the RCs, CCs, and schools mill into the farm every weekend to pick up freshly slaughtered fresh frog meat and other livestock like catfish and snakeheads.

Opening this privately owned production farm to the public provided an opportunity for me as a Singaporean graduate to become a 2nd generation business owner. I grabbed this great opportunity as a young adult in my early 20s. My relationship with the visitors has never been simple. Back when I was a child residing in the farm, I used to see people walking into our house, taking off their shoes and walking into my home to use my toilets as if it is an entitlement. We encountered and still are seeing the same problems with the only surviving Kampong in Singapore, people littering, abusing the facilities, and sometimes, they walk into our facilities only to abuse the people working in it.

Seldom, you get credits for what you are doing right. More than often you get penalized for the lapses due to what you did not do.

Isn’t it important for our younger generation to know that farms (whether it is a production or a show farm) exist and are important features of our country? Aren’t we also a part of national education in the history of Singapore which saw the farms having to transcend to remain relevant in this time and age?

Malaysians will tell you that this place feels comfortable like home not only because of the proximity we are from JB, but simply JFF is a reflection of the frog farming industry in Singapore 20 years back. Operations have certainly changed, business has become diversified but the place remains the same. The faster this country moves, the harder the people are whipped to keep pace with progress.

Nostalgia – This must be what many generations of Singaporeans, from the baby boomers to the Gen Y, can identify with.

Australians will tell you that this is an interesting place because they embrace and accept the diversity of what Singapore offers. We will have a high and mighty, snooty side like MBS, but we also offer a humble, down to earth rustic charm in the Kranji Countryside.

Others from certain parts of the world might come in baffled by this existence of a rural, backward, frogs not in lily padded ponds but in pens and questioned why did our government, one that is “prim and proper” allow this existence? Spot on. The farm’s lifespan on this plot of land in Lim Chu Kang is timed. Nothing really lasts forever in Singapore anyway. I implore you to come and appreciate what you see here because we may not be here much longer.

To some of our dear foreign visitors, if you are expecting a 5 star toilet experience or maybe l’occitane fragrance in farms, simply because this is the first world Singapore, please do not have your hopes up too high. We are only a family of 5 who have lived on, were fed and educated by this trade which my father started. What works in your country may not work in mine. Diversity is the only normal these days so if I do not tell you how to live please do not come and tell me how my frogs and I should live.

 Without you, my dear visitors, who have given me so much support and advice, I would truly be “that frog in the well”. However, I hope that you would adopt “live and let live” as your motto too. Please accept and be nice to the people living in this host country you are visiting.

 As JFF approaches her 31st anniversary in October, and I am into my 7th year of employment here, I would like to thank all of my staff, my customers, my friends and my family for all the support throughout my stint. I will strive to reach the bar set by society’s standards during the remaining time we have on this premises.

 Written by: Chelsea Wan

Any comments, please contact me at chelseawan@jurongfrogfarm.com.sg.

30th Anniversary Flea for FREE!!

Yes, you read it right!
Booth rental at NO COST!

Calling out to everyone who is getting rid of their stuff! Book a booth TODAY as slots are limited!!!

As the saying goes, “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure!!!”

Join us on this joyous occasion!!!