NTUC FairPrice Promotion!

Want to know where to buy our FROZEN Frog Legs and get our Jurong Frog Farm ‘Go Green’ recycling bag FREE?

We have a Promotion going on right now! Buy every 2 packets of Frozen Frog Legs at selected NTUC FairPrice Supermarket outlets and get 1 Jurong Frog Farm ‘Go Green’ Recycling Bag for FREE.

 

You can find this promotion available at the Selected NTUC Fairprice supermarkets over here:

AMK Hub Hypermarket Fairprice Xtra

53 Ang Mo Kio Avenue 3, #B2-26, Ang Mo Kio Hub, 569933

Toa Payoh HDB Hub Fairprice

500 Lorong 6 Toa Payoh, #B1-32/#01-33, HDB Hub, 310500

Bedok Mall Finest

311 New Upper Changi Rd, B2-60 Bedok Mall, 467360

Century Square FairPrice Finest

2 Tampines Central 5, #B1/07/08/17, Century Square, Century Square, 529509

 

Look out for this sign at the Seafood Section of the supermarket and grab your Frozen Frog Now!

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To find out other NTUC FairPrice outlets* that carry our Fresh Frog Meat and Frozen Frog Legs, please click on this link: https://jurongfrogfarm.com.sg/recipes/

 

Go Green Go Local! While Stocks Last!

*other outlets may carry our Fresh Frog Meat or Frozen Frog Legs but are not part of the promotion as stated above.

Join Singapore Young Farmers (SYF) in a series of events from Sept – Nov 2015!

I put my hand up last year Dec to lead a team of young farmers (formed mostly by the next generation of our farmers members from the Kranji Countryside Association) in an initiative to connect more young people to our beautiful countryside and farmland.

After months of planning, I’m happy to share that the Singapore Young Farmer (SYF) Team has confirmed the schedule and activities for what we like to call ‘SYF: THE NEXT CHAPTER!’ More information can be found on this link.

I thought I should share about what my involvement at the frog farm has got to do with the SYF.

8 years ago, as a much younger person, being entirely new to this industry, I was introduced to the good work of Kranji Countryside Association. I then volunteered my time as a committee member to tend to the association’s email and to attend their monthly meetings. As a result I got to know the farmers much better and we developed into a close-knit family. The KCA grew in strength and size until in 2007 we became an associate member of Royal Agricultural Society of the Commonwealth. Kenny Eng, the then Vice- president of KCA and myself were sent off to Christchurch, New Zealand, to attend the 25th biennial Agriculture Conference in 2008.

Being the younger member of the committee, I  went on to  represent KCA as a Next Generation delegate for the next 3 Royal Agricultural Conferences in Edinburgh in 2010, Zambia in 2012 and most recently  Brisbane in 2014.  It was indeed very strange for a young Singaporean to be represented to in these large scale, very serious, agricultural conferences as C’MON give me a break, what have we got to offer!?!

While I questioned how valid my presence were, I have made so many new friends who are also children of farmers (some are 4th or 5th generations!) and surprisingly, most of us faced similar challenges in planning  succession and trying to keep farming relevant and sustainable in this increasingly demanding world. I also learned how many of these societies with advanced farming industries have dedicated teams getting Youth interested and involved in what is in Singapore considered a dying or ‘Sunset’ industry. I wondered why is it in Singapore, which once was the center for Agricultural Excellence in S.E.A., that farming has been relegated to such a lowly status that it is almost invisible to the common man. Farmland gave way to  ‘Agrotechnology’ Parks and Farms pushed to operate like factories.

Now that D day is set in mid 2017, our SYF team has decided not to let this flame of Singapore’s countryside be extinguished without a good fight.  Thus, we have planned these series of activities for the last quarter of 2015 with an aim to connect as many people as we can possible do to this land!

One minister I have spoken to asked me if I could advocate for other causes “and not a dying one”.Another told me that without the military needing the land for training, farmlands wouldn’t have even remained in Lim Chu Kang in the first place. Despite these remarks, they have not changed our opinion that every country needs a countryside and that it is in this 1% of remaining green land that many farmer families work and toil tirelessly together as one community to bring fresh and safe food with a heart to many of their fellow Singaporeans’ tables.

I urge our government to see beyond production figures and KPIs but the entire value system the farmers at the Kranji Countryside have created for their workers, families, children, the countless number of students who visit us for their learning journeys and the countless members of the public who ‘escape’ to seek respite, recharge their batteries and rekindle that sense of being grounded. Table that into your calculation of productivity and we can make a difference to our very own Singapore Happiness Index.

Come join us and sign up here!!

Have a good week ahead all!

Frogologist

More awareness needed on importance of food security

I read the commentary “The rising challenge of our fragile food security” (Aug 22) with much interest. Mr Barry Desker rightly highlighted that food security is a “politically sensitive” issue, especially for import-dependent nations like Singapore.

Just because agriculture and farming is out of sight for many of us does not mean it should be out of our minds. However, among my peers, I find that young Singaporeans are not aware of the challenges facing food supplies and do not seem to care.

Singapore ranks 16th among 107 countries in the Global Food Security Index 2013 compiled by the Economist Intelligence Unit. We scored much higher compared to our neighbouring countries in South-east Asia, and even higher than other wealthy Asian nations such as South Korea and Japan.

This ranking, I believe, is testament to our high standards of living, our government agencies’ good work in regulating quality of food and the assistance available to help poorer Singaporeans with access to food.

But we should not take high levels of food security for granted. As a nation, there are four things we should do.

First, we should do more to boost local production of food to decrease our reliance on import markets. This can be done through agricultural research and development, which might help us maximise the limited land and water resources that we have.

At our frog farm, we have successfully harvested frog fallopian tubes (which were usually thrown away) and processed it into edible hashima.

Second, we should look at alternative sources of food. If people are willing to try out different sources of protein, such as frogs, crocodiles and quails, the strain on food supplies might be eased.

Third, we should look at ways to reduce the environmental impact of food production. Mr Desker mentioned that “most governments charge farmers 10 to 20 per cent of the price paid by industrial users or households for water consumption”. We, farmers in Singapore, do not enjoy such subsidies and pay the same rate for agricultural water as other manufacturers. Thus, we have to make judicious use of water.

At our farm, we have worked with local tertiary institutions on ways to recycle frog skin by making it into usable hide. We have done internal R&D on processing the frog fats into usable oil for lamps.

We also encourage our customers to bring their cooler bags or recycle the styrofoam boxes (provided by us) when they shop with us to enjoy a recycling effort rebate.

Finally, we should educate young Singaporeans more about agriculture and food production.

Many of our senior citizens are familiar with agriculture, as Singapore used to have more farms. They may also have experienced periods of hunger and food shortage in Singapore’s early days.

But our younger Singaporeans never had to worry about having enough food to eat and may take things for granted.

Submitted to TODAY papers on 2nd September 2013.

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