JFF @ World Food Festival 2013!

Hey there, JFF Friends!

Over a period of 4 days at Singapore Expo for the World Food Festival 2013, the JFF Team has concluded that it was a resounding success, in many ways more than one. It is also the start of new friendships made with neighboring booths and that it was an incredible learning journey for us!

Thus we would like to take this opportunity to express our greatest gratitude to each and every one of you for the overwhelming response and support. The huge support we received is the reason why we pushed on and we were all smiles even till the last hour of operation on the last day!!

We also would like to also thank our full timers, part timers and visitors who were roped in to be part of our JFF Team Froggie at the booth and also, Richard who was tasked to hold the fort back home at our Royal Frog Shop.

In case you’ve missed out and wondering what we’d done during the event, scroll down for a glimpse of our exhilarating 4 days event!

opening!
Gearing up for the event!
Dried Hashima 10g offer!
Dried Hashima 10g offer!
supporters like him is why we pushed on!
supporters like him is why we pushed on!
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Offer offer offer!
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is it a shrek? no, it is frog master with a cute frog headband!
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some candid pose
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promoting royal hashima dessert samples with a smile
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samples going out fast!
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fresh farm products
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hows this for a t-shirt?
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with a loudspeaker to draw crowd’s attention
kangaroo anyone?
kangaroo anyone?

That’s a wrap for the JFF Team @ World Food Festival 2013. As for now, please keep supporting us either by liking our Facebook page and follow our WordPress. We can’t emphasise how much your support means to us. Deeply appreciate it!

Stay tune for more exciting events coming up!

FRACTS #6 – touching a toad gives you warts ?

Touch a toad you’ll get warts, right? Wrong!

Most toads look as if they have warts, buy they don’t give them. Touch a toad and you’ll find a friend, right? Maybe! Toads can become very tame.

Touch a toad if you can but touch it gently. If a toad becomes frightened, glands in its skin may ooze a milky juice which is poisonous to most animals if they swallow it. This poison saves toads from enemies as they cannot hop away as fast as their frog cousins can.

Some enemies don’t seem to be bothered by a toad’s poison, so they have other tricks to try.

For example, a toad can puff up until it’s too big to swallow.

Hiding is another toad trick. It blends in with its surroundings and can even change colour.

Many toads burrow in soft dirt when danger threatens, digging backward with their hind legs.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4i3AB320zk]

Toads may also protect themselves by playing dead.

Here is a cute video showing how tame a toad can be and playing dead.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDyRAykxw_E]

 

Disclaimer: All pictures copyright to their respective owner(s). jurongfrogfarm.com.sg does not claim ownership of any of the pictures displayed on this site unless stated otherwise. jurongfrogfarm.com.sg does not knowingly intend or attempt to offend or violate any copyright or intellectual property rights of any entity. Some images used on jurongfrogfarm.com.sg are taken from the web and believed to be in the public domain. The pictures are provided for educational purposes only.

If any images posted here are in violation of copyright law, please contact us (events@jurongfrogfarm.com.sg) and we will gladly remove the offending images immediately upon receipt of valid proof of copyright infringement.

Reference:
http://www.norcrossws.org/html/frogsandtoads.htm

http://www.welcomewildlife.com/?folder=pages/urban%20wildlife/amphibians

Fracts #5 – Do all frogs lay their eggs in water ?

Most amphibians lay their eggs in fresh water or on land, but others are viviparous, meaning the babies grow within the mother’s body and are born live.

Frogs are among the most prolific breeders and can lay anywhere from 1 egg to 25,000, while salamanders lay a few dozen. Some frogs and salamanders defend their eggs and may carry eggs or tadpoles on their backs. For species which practice internal fertilization, females guard the eggs. For eggs that are externally fertilized, males guard and defend the eggs within their territory. In fact, paternal care is most common in fish and amphibians and not mammals!

Main reasons why frogs lay eggs in water

  • Moisture: Frog eggs require moisture or they will dry up and die. Frogs lay their eggs coated in a jelly-like glycoprotein. The jelly helps keep the eggs from drying out, but must maintain contact with a moisture source. Frogs can lay their eggs on pond vegetation, floating on the water’s surface, or on the pond bottom. Many frogs lay their eggs in vernal pools, which are large, temporary puddles formed by spring rains.
  • Tadpoles: Adult frogs can survive on land and in water, but tadpoles can survive in water only. They have gills for underwater breathing and tails for swimming. If tadpoles hatched on land, they would not be able to breath or move around.
  • Protection: Bird eggs have hard shells that protect the embryos from trauma. Because frog eggs are soft and moist, they require cushioning to protect the developing tadpoles. Water provides this cushioning.
  • Guarding: A few frog species, such as Darwin’s Frog, watch over their eggs and guard them from predators. Darwin’s Frog is primarily aquatic and would not be able to guard eggs laid on land away from the water.

Case study: Darwin’s Frog

Darwin’s frogs have a rather odd and unique way of protecting their young from predators

Male Darwin’s frogs engage in a behavior called mouth-brooding, where they take their own fertilized eggs into their mouth just before they hatch.  They’re not eating them.  Instead they store them in the vocal sacs that they otherwise use to make mating calls to attract females.  There the tadpoles hatch and develop in complete safety from fish, dragonfly larvae and all the other aquatic predators that normally threaten them (unless of course daddy gets eaten himself), surviving on the nutrients of the yolk that their mother’s egg provided them.

When the tadpoles fully complete metamorphosis inside their father’s vocal sac, he opens his mouth and “barfs” them out into the world, miniature versions of himself ready to fend for themselves.

Watch this video to see the tadpoles writhing underneath the skin of these daddy frogs just before they reach full development and he barfs them out to begin life on their own.  You can’t help but watch this and be fascinated at how odd and wonderful the natural world is!

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=HCxv6AbBwJI]

Disclaimer: All pictures copyright to their respective owner(s). jurongfrogfarm.com.sg does not claim ownership of any of the pictures displayed on this site unless stated otherwise. jurongfrogfarm.com.sg does not knowingly intend or attempt to offend or violate any copyright or intellectual property rights of any entity. Some images used on jurongfrogfarm.com.sg are taken from the web and believed to be in the public domain. The pictures are provided for educational purposes only.

If any images posted here are in violation of copyright law, please contact us (events@jurongfrogfarm.com.sg) and we will gladly remove the offending images immediately upon receipt of valid proof of copyright infringement.

Glossary
Viviparous
an animal that gives birth to live young. Contrast with Oviparous and Ovoviviparous
Metamorphosis a biological process by which an animal physically develops after birth or hatching, involving a conspicuous and relatively abrupt change in the animal’s body structure through cell growth and differentiation

Reference
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120910142632.htm
http://www.worldanimalfoundation.net/f/TreeFrog.pdf
http://animals.pawnation.com/main-reason-frogs-lay-eggs-water-4238.html
http://blogs.discovery.com/animal_oddities/2011/08/frog-daddy-barfs-out-babies.html

JFF invites you on Singapore’s 48th National Day!

Good morning JFF Friends!

Click on the link below to be entertained by a JFF Production produced by Zack, our Frog Master. See what JFF will be doing for Singapore’s 48th Birthday celebration!

For those of you staying onshore, we are looking forward to having you here croaking with us on the 9th August!

Happy Sunday and Enjoy the clip

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwivjSSDoFM]

Fracts #4 – What a frog might say

Do you know that for some species of frogs, only the males sing?

Every different species of frog makes it’s own special sound and it is only the male frog that can croak. They have a small sac in their throats that vibrates the air as they slowly let it out.

Other types of frogs appear to have both male and female calls.

Large frogs have deep voices, meaning they call at a low frequency. For example, the Male American Bullfrog’s call is reminiscent of the roar of a bull, which gives the frog its common name.

Small frogs sing in high chirps, meaning they call at a high frequency.

Cold frogs repeat their calls at a slower rate because the muscles controlling the sounds slow down!

Why do frogs sing? Well…it’s actually for a variety of reasons!

Sometimes, frogs sing when they are trying to attract a mate. “HEY! Baby!”
Sometimes, frogs sing to mark their territory. “This is MY Lilypad!”
Sometimes, frogs sing becasue they know the weather is going to change. “Rain!!!”
Sometimes, frogs squeek when they are frightened or hurt. “Ouch! Eek!”

A bonus joke for today’s Fracts,

frog joke 1

Fracts #3 – The effects of Globalisation on frogs

Globalisation is an intensively debated topic and encompasses many different areas. For this article, we shall define globalisation as the intensification of trade within nations, specifically the import and export of frogs. Frogs can be found in almost every corner of the Earth and this had allowed them to diversify into 4000 types including toads. Each species of frog has it’s own niche that enables them to thrive in their environment, hence making them the best bioindicators to study the ecosystem.

Quoted by Charles Darwin,

“In the struggle for survival, the fittest win out at the expense of their rivals because they succeed in adapting themselves best to their environment.”

For example, tadpoles keep waterways clean by feeding on algae. Adult frogs eat large quantities of insects, including disease vectors that can transmit fatal illnesses to humans (i.e. mosquitoes/malaria). Frogs also serve as an important food source to a diverse array of predators, including dragonflies, fish, snakes, birds, beetles, centipedes and even monkeys.

Thus, a decrease in frog populations disturbs an intricate food web, and results in negative impacts that cascade through the ecosystem.

In our previous Fracts #2, we have discussed how Scientists around the world had been using South African Clawed Frogs for research as well as conducting pregnancy test. In Fracts #3, we will be exploring the implications of such activity.

Yes, frogs may have adapted well to its environment. However, the introduction of foreign species not only increase competition of getting food and space, it also introduces new diseases and other threats (as introduced in our Fracts #1 – The Amphibian Crisis)

A case study

Inadvertently introduced to Australia when the African clawed frog was imported for use in a pregnancy test, chytrid fungus is a global problem threatening all species of frogs, including Australia’s critically endangered southern corroboree frog and the stuttering frog.

A water-borne disease, chytrid fungus attacks the keratin in the skin around the animal’s feet and under the mouth. The theory is that this effects the iron balance in the body, which has neurological effects. Infected frogs become lethargic and unable to eat but probably die

There is currently no treatment or effective infection control for the fungus in the wild.

In conclusion, the balance of the ecosystem is fragile in such a way that any slight change/introduction of an animal population may cause irreversible damage to a habitat.

The ability of humans to manipulate nature is a disadvantage but it is also a great asset. Therefore, each and everyone of us can make a difference by changing our perception of the world and that we are not living alone on this one and only Blue Planet called Earth.

Dictionary:
Niche – the position or function of an organism in a community of plants and animals.

 

Disclaimer: All pictures copyright to their respective owner(s). jurongfrogfarm.com.sg does not claim ownership of any of the pictures displayed on this site unless stated otherwise. jurongfrogfarm.com.sg does not knowingly intend or attempt to offend or violate any copyright or intellectual property rights of any entity. Some images used on jurongfrogfarm.com.sg are taken from the web and believed to be in the public domain. The pictures are provided for educational purposes only.

If any images posted here are in violation of copyright law, please contact us (events@jurongfrogfarm.com.sg) and we will gladly remove the offending images immediately upon receipt of valid proof of copyright infringement.

Reference:
http://www.theage.com.au/national/ancient-fungus-has-worlds-frogs-in-its-deadly-grip-20130604-2nodj.html
http://www.frog-life-cycle.com/frog-myths.html
http://www.savethefrogs.com/why-frogs/

Fracts #2 – A frog can tell you’re pregnant?

Before the modern development of pregnancy test kits, what is one of the ways that can tell you’re pregnant?

You guessed it…

FROGS!

For 20 years, 1930s to 1950s, Scientists around the world had been using South African Clawed Frogs for research as well as conducting pregnancy test.

Wait a second, how do you use frog to test for a baby?

Once urine sample is collected, it is then injected into the frog’s dorsal lymph sac in the morning and by the end of the day, results can be concluded. A dose of a pregnant woman’s pee will cause a female South African Clawed Frog to lay effs within eight to 12 hours. The test also works on male frogs, which produce sperm in response to the injection.

Why does it work?

It works because a pregnant woman’s urine contains a hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin, or hCG. This is exactly how most modern pregnancy test rely on the detection of hCG using other means like antibodies after 1960s.

In 1930, a scientist based in Cape Town, South Africa, named Lancelot Hogben reported that he could use ox hormones to control ovulation in a local frog species—Xenopus laevis. His discovery was important for two reasons: First, it provided embryologists with a frog that could produce eggs year-round. Second, it provided doctors with a new animal for pregnancy testing. By 1933, doctors were using the “Hogben test” to detect hCG in urine.

The Hogben test was both rapid and reliable, and it spread quickly throughout Europe and the United States over the next two decades. Scientists were able to rear the clawed frogs in captivity, but it was easier to import them from Africa in large numbers. Either way, the reliance on live animals posed problems for the big testing centers. Even a facility with several thousand frogs could be shut down by a virulent disease outbreak. The development of new testing methods in the 1960s made the Hogben test obsolete.

Disclaimer: All pictures copyright to their respective owner(s). jurongfrogfarm.com.sg does not claim ownership of any of the pictures displayed on this site unless stated otherwise. jurongfrogfarm.com.sg does not knowingly intend or attempt to offend or violate any copyright or intellectual property rights of any entity. Some images used on jurongfrogfarm.com.sg are taken from the web and believed to be in the public domain. The pictures are provided for educational purposes only.

If any images posted here are in violation of copyright law, please contact us (events@jurongfrogfarm.com.sg) and we will gladly remove the offending images immediately upon receipt of valid proof of copyright infringement.

Reference:
http://d3rmmzlisdjvlb.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/shutterstock_49901470.jpg
http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/explainer/2006/01/the_amphibian_pregnancy_test.html
http://science.howstuffworks.com/zoology/reptiles-amphibians/frog6.htm

Fracts #1 – The Amphibian Crisis

So let’s begin with the birth of our first Fracts: Fract #1

Do you know that the earliest Frogs were known to have lived as early as 265 million years ago (Permian era) compared to us modern humans (Homo Sapiens)  150 000 years old.

Having to live and survive through mass extinctions, frogs have earned itself as one of the most resilient and adaptable creatures on Earth. Perhaps due to the fact that Frogs are amphibians, they can live on both land water, allows them to have an alternative hideout away from natural disasters. Today, there are nearly 4000 types of frogs, including toads, and they can be found on almost every continent (in green) except Antartica where the climate is very cold all year round.  .

800px-Distribution.anura.1

However, frogs (and other amphibians) today may not be able to survive the next mass extinction that the Herpetologists call it, The Amphibian Crisis. Watch this video clip to find out more!

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6FBn0x6XwEQ]

Therefore, what are your views on this crisis? Are we humans responsible? What you readers reckon all of us can do our part to save their existence on this Earth?

If you would like to share your opinions on how we can save our frog friends, do feel free to reply in the comment box.

 

Disclaimer: All pictures copyright to their respective owner(s). jurongfrogfarm.com.sg does not claim ownership of any of the pictures displayed on this site unless stated otherwise. jurongfrogfarm.com.sg does not knowingly intend or attempt to offend or violate any copyright or intellectual property rights of any entity. Some images used on jurongfrogfarm.com.sg are taken from the web and believed to be in the public domain. The pictures are provided for educational purposes only.

If any images posted here are in violation of copyright law, please contact us (events@jurongfrogfarm.com.sg) and we will gladly remove the offending images immediately upon receipt of valid proof of copyright infringement.

The birth of Fracts

Knowledge is power. Information is liberating. Education is the premise of progress, in every society, in every family.

– Kofi Annan

Just like how our tour programmes are designed to cater to different age groups, learning neither only happen in schools nor stop when you graduate from it! Learning happens everywhere and is a life long process!

Very well then, can anyone guess what is Fracts? (Hint: A combination of what we do here in the farm and a source of learning)

The answer: Frog + Facts = Fracts (Please highlight on the blank space to reveal the answer)

Congratulations if you have guessed it right! Fun isn’t it?

Here in Jurong Frog Farm, we believe that education in a farm setting plays a crucial role in society. Education, apart from other things, makes up society. From reference to this article, one of the reasons why we behave and decide the way we do is due to ‘framing and anchoring’. In other words, every decision depends on information. For example, frogs are amphibians and without water in their natural habitat, they will die. It is this kind of information that tells us that we must conserve mother nature (by having the habit of 3 Rs) as much as we can so that we do not destroy the natural habitat of frogs and other animals.

Hence, by sharing knowledge about the wonderful history and life of frogs, as well as its threats, we can play a part to make informed decisions before behaving in a certain way, especially towards our dear friend, the Frogs.

(CROAK CROACK!) – “that’s right!” in frog language.

Basically, Fracts (a singular noun) is a weekly episode of frog facts combined with occasional humour  and thought provoking articles that will make you muse and ponder.

So, stay tuned for Fracts #1!

Note:
3 Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

Haze Promotion (While haze last!)

DO YOU KNOW that hashima has properties of nourishment of lungs? Now that Singapore is shrouded by this haze and we have practically no idea when the haze will pass, try out our 100% Singapore Safe bottled hashima for a refreshing concoction brewed out of specially selected Hashima, American ginseng and rock sugar, which nourishes your lungs while at the same time improving your skin complexion!

JFF Specially Selected Dried Hashima is handpicked, cleaned and dried at 60 degrees to retain maximum level of collagen proteins.

It contains 18 kinds of amino acids and rich in epidermal growth factor that can promote cell division and cell regeneration.

A 100% Singapore Safe product that is fast growing in popularity, we have now expanded in our Hashima products range to include Bottled Premium Hashima with American Ginseng! This is a 100% natural product with no preservatives and artificial colourings or flavouring.

Hashima is commonly consumed for the benefits as below:

  • Improving skin complexion.
  • Rich in epidermal growth factor that can promote cell division, delicate white skin, cell regeneration
  • Contains small amount of natural hormones which is beneficial to human testosterone, estradiol and progesterone
  • Replenishing vital essence and nourishment of the lungs and kidneys,
  • Prescribed to treat respiratory symptoms such as coughing and night sweats due to tuberculosis.

Each box of Premium Hashima with American Ginseng is $28.80 Nett (4 bottles of concentrate).

We are offering a HAZE PROMOTION from now till the HAZE disappears!

For every 10 boxes of Premium Hashima with American Ginseng, you will get 1 Box FOC!

For every 20 boxes of Premium Hashima with American Ginseng, you will get 3 Boxes FOC!

For every 30 boxes of Premium Hashima with American Ginseng, you will get 5 Boxes FOC!

Offer is valid while stock lasts!

FREE Office/ Home delivery services.

Please call 6791 7229 or email to sales@jurongfrogfarm.com.sg for any query or to place your order right now!

We will love to hear from you soon!

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